29 May 1848

Wisconsin is admitted as the 30th USA state.

May 29, 1848 – Wisconsin Became the 30th State Admitted to the Union.
The state of Wisconsin, wholly formed out of the Northwest Territories, was named after the Wisconsin River. “Wisconsin” means “grassy place” in the Chippewa language.Wisconsin is known as The Badger State. This nickname originally referred to the lead miners of the 1830s, who worked at the Galena lead mines in Illinois. These mines were in northwestern Illinois close to the borders of Wisconsin and Iowa. The Wisconsin miners lived, not in houses, but in temporary caves cut into the hillsides. The caves were described as badger dens and, the miners who lived in them, as badgers. The miners brought the nickname back to Wisconsin. Eventually, the nickname was applied to all of the people of Wisconsin and, finally, to the state itself. The badger was adopted as Wisconsin’s state animal in 1957.

Wisconsin is full of natural beauty, and there is also a standout feature in the man-made wonders department:

The Quadracci Pavilion is a sculptural, postmodern addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum completed in 2001, designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. The hall’s chancel is shaped like the prow of a ship, with floor-to-ceiling windows looking over Lake Michigan. The signature wings, the Burke Brise Soleil, form a moveable sunscreen with a 217-foot wingspan. The entire structure weighs 90 tons. It takes 3.5 minutes for the wings to open or close, which happens Tuesday through Sunday around noon.

29 May 1727

Peter II becomes the Tsar of Russia.

Peter II, Russian in full Pyotr Alekseyevich, emperor of Russia from 1727 to 1730. Grandson of Peter I the Great, Peter II was named heir to the Russian throne by Catherine I and was crowned at the age of 11. Because Catherine had named the Supreme Privy Council to act as regent for the youth, Aleksandr D. Menshikov, who had been a close adviser to both Peter I and Catherine I and had become the most prominent member of the council, dominated the first months of Peter’s reign. Menshikov installed the young emperor in his own household and arranged for his daughter and Peter to become betrothed. Peter, however, did not welcome the domineering kindness of his guardian and turned to the Dolgorukys, an old aristocratic family. In September 1727 the Dolgoruky family arrested Menshikov, exiled him to Siberia, and replaced him as the dominant political figures in Russia. They subsequently moved Peter’s capital from St. Petersburg to Moscow and prepared for Peter’s marriage to Princess Yekaterina Alekseyevna Dolgorukaya. On the day set for the wedding, however, Peter II died of smallpox.

This jostling and conniving began under the reign of Catherine I, who meant to marry him off to Maria, the daughter of Prince Menshikov, that comrade of Peter the Great who had become an all-powerful “advisor” during Catherine’s six-year reign. Shortly after Catherine’s death in 1727, the twelve-year-old Emperor was indeed betrothed to the sixteen-year-old Maria Menshikov. The influential Menshikov, for all practical purposes the ruler of the country and head of the Supreme Privy Council, did everything in his power to protect and promote the young Emperor. He even began building a palace for him not far from his own, which was the largest palace in the capital at that time. However, Menshikov fell seriously ill and was unable to attend court, so the Emperor rapidly fell under the influence of his teacher, the Vice Chancellor Osterman and the new favorite, Ivan Dolgorukov. In the blink of an eye, the Menshikov estates were confiscated, he himself was forced to resign and, together with his entire family, he was exiled to the city of Berezov in Siberia.